Black Water Pouring Out Of Texas Faucets

Black Water Pouring Out Of Texas Faucets

A Texas town is facing a serious health crisis as black contaminated water is pouring out of the town’s residents’ faucets, according to an Fox News article written last night. This comes on the heals of a serious political scandal as the town’s “mayor, city manager, mayor pro tempore, a city councilman and a former councilman were arrested earlier this week.” Not only have the residents been left with little to no government representatives, they also have “no water to drink.” Concerned citizens have banned  together and are donating bottled water to the town until the municipal water is safe.

According to Fox News, “Joel Barajas – the only City Council member not facing criminal charges – told the San Antonio Express-News that he was grateful to residents elsewhere in the region who donated water. The city has blamed the water problem on dirt and mud build up in a water tank that was flushed, the newspaper reported.”

Despite the water bottle donations, the town’s residents are not happy. “We didn’t get a warning” one resident said, “We didn’t get a warning that this was going to happen.”

The Laredo office of the Texas Commission on Environmental is investigating the reports of black water and a water department employee said residents should boil water before using it.

While the people of this Texas town have real signs that they should be worried about their water, your water doesn’t have to be completely black to be unsafe. As we know, the people of Flint (and many other towns) have been dealing with a serious health crisis as unsafe levels of lead were found in the drinking water. This was exceptionally scary because heavy metals like lead, and contaminants like E. coli or Giardia do not change the look or taste of your water. That means that you can’t tell if your water is contaminated by taste or look alone.

So how can we be sure that our water is safe?

“This is  reminder to all of us,”  says Fresh Water Systems Water Quality Specialist Geoff Dethloff, “that even if we have a municipal water source, we are not immune to having contaminants in our water.” Dethloff goes onto explain that while black water is not a common problem, we should be aware of what could potentially be contaminating out water. Fresh Water Systems offers a number of water quality tests that you can do quickly and easily. There are at-home test kits and lab send-in test kits depending on what you prefer.

“If you are concerned about bacteria or particulate matter,” says Dethloff, “you should look into getting a UV system [for the bacteria], and a filter [for the dirt.” Fresh Water Systems offers the Viqua IHS UV system, which filters our sediment and also disinfects your water.

If you have any questions, please call us at (866) 986-8895. One of our certified water quality specialists will be happy to assist you.

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Fracking Linked To Water Contamination

Fracking Linked To Water Contamination

A recent article posted in EcoWatch links fracking to water contamination. As the story reads:

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published their long-awaited draft fracking drinking water study and concluded:fracking has had no widespread impact on drinking water. But if you’ve had your ear to the ground in fracking communities, something didn’t sit right with the EPA’s takeaway. Though the gas industry claims fracking is safe and doesn’t harm drinking water, that story doesn’t match what many landowners report from the fracking fields.

In Pennsylvania, 271 confirmed cases of water degradation due to unconventional natural gas operations (a.k.a. fracking) have been reported.

 

So how can you protect yourself from contamination in your private well? FreshWaterSystems.com has all the answers and products that you need.

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Could Your Tap Water Be Unsafe?

Could Your Tap Water Be Unsafe?

Fox News recently posted an article asking the question, “How safe is your tap water?” And while the EPA’s Safe Water Drinking act does regulate close to 90 water contaminants, the U.S. uses 60,000 chemicals that could get in our water supply. So how can we be certain that our water is safe to drink?

“My biggest concerns are pharmaceuticals and fluoride,” water expert Michael Cervin told FoxNews.com. “Sure, arsenic, lead, uranium and mercury all sound bad, but they are far less worrisome than man-made toxins.”

While this may seem scary, Cervin tells us not to be afraid, saying: “Fear does no good, education does.” And “There are hundreds of different water filter systems available for consumers to choose from – everything from pitchers and dispensers to mounted filter faucets and reverse osmosis systems.”

What are those systems? It depends on what contaminants you are worried about, but FreshWaterSystems.com has a range of filters and disinfecting systems that can help any water problem. Click here to figure out what will work best for you.

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Unsafe Lead Levels Not Limited To Flint, According To The NY Times

Unsafe Lead Levels Not Limited To Flint, According To The NY Times

According to an article written today in the New York Times, lead contamination is not only in Flint, Michigan and we all have reason to be concerned. In recent years, unsafe levels of lead have been found in:

  1. Sebring, OH (2016)
  2. Washington, DC (2001)
  3. Durham and Greenville, NC (2006)
  4. Columbia, SC (2005)
  5. Jackson, MS (2015)

While “Federal officials and many scientists agree that most of the nation’s 53,000 community water systems provide safe drinking water…such episodes are unsettling reminders of what experts say are holes in the safety net of rules and procedures intended to keep water not just lead-free, but free of all poisons.” So what can we do about it?

Fresh Water Systems offers a number of solutions to lead detection and decontamination. You can also read another one of our blog posts about lead contamination to help figure out if you have lead in your water.

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Three Ways To Stop Using Plastic

Three Ways To Stop Using Plastic

I recently wrote a blog post about a study featured in CNN that warns consumers that even BPA-free plastic is bad for your health. After writing and researching for that post, I looked around my apartment, my bathroom and my kitchen with new eyes. I had plastic everywhere. My reusable water bottle, food containers, and frozen food bags were all made of plastic. In my bathroom, I have a plastic tooth brush, plastic containers for liquid soap, shampoo, conditioner, face wash and mouth wash, and a plastic shower curtain. There is plastic in my shoes, my hair bands, and my hangers. Everywhere around me there is plastic. If the obvious environmental issues involved in using so much plastic were not enough to worry me, the recent article I wrote on the health issues involved in plastic use got me thinking: What are some ways that I can stop using plastic and use a healthier, more eco-friendly alternative?

  1. Use a glass water bottle.

The first and most obvious change that I opted to make was to use a glass water bottle. I try to drink as much water as I can in a day, and I take my water bottle with me to the gym and to yoga. If there is any plastic product that I use on a regular basis, it is this one. FWS offers a number of inexpensive plastic-free bottle choices.

 

2. Use an ecological toothbrush.

If plastic really is a bad as all of the studies say that it is, then brushing my teeth twice, sometimes three, times a day with a plastic toothbrush needs to change. I researched plastic-free alternatives and switched to a compostable bamboo toothbrush. I was worried that it would not brush as well as a plastic toothbrush, but I was wrong. It works just a well and I don’t have the negative health or environmental impact to worry about.

 

3. Switch to glass or ceramic food containers. 

I prepare a lot of my food for the week ahead of time during the weekend so that I don’t need to rush around during my lunch break to try and find what I want to eat. This is a great way to make sure that I am always prepared with food, and that I stick to my healthy way of living, but it is not so great when it comes to the containers that I use. I will often put warm (or even hot) food in plastic containers after I am done preparing it. I’ll then throw it in the fridge and eat from it later in the day or week. This is not good for my health at all, as studies show that the chemicals from the plastic can actually leach into food and then stay stored in my body. I invested in some glass containers and aside from being healthier for me, they actually hold the food a lot better, do not bend or break, and stack much nicer.

4. Reuse and Recycle Plastic Bags.

Some cities in the United States have put a ban on single use plastic bags. Both side of the debate have valid points for and against the use of plastic bags but an immediate step we all can take remembering the “R’s” (reduce, reuse, and recycle). There here are two blog posts that give some ideas how to reuse ziplock bags and reuse plastic grocery bags. We all can do our part in recycling all plastics not just bags. If you need to find a recycle center close to where you live Earth 911 has a great resource that can be found here.

 

In total, this lifestyle change cost me around $40 (and that is mainly because I bought a whole lot of glass containers). People always think that switching to healthier or more environmentally-friendly products will be exponentially more expensive, but that is not entirely true.

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