Black Water Pouring Out Of Texas Faucets

Black Water Pouring Out Of Texas Faucets

A Texas town is facing a serious health crisis as black contaminated water is pouring out of the town’s residents’ faucets, according to an Fox News article written last night. This comes on the heals of a serious political scandal as the town’s “mayor, city manager, mayor pro tempore, a city councilman and a former councilman were arrested earlier this week.” Not only have the residents been left with little to no government representatives, they also have “no water to drink.” Concerned citizens have banned  together and are donating bottled water to the town until the municipal water is safe.

According to Fox News, “Joel Barajas – the only City Council member not facing criminal charges – told the San Antonio Express-News that he was grateful to residents elsewhere in the region who donated water. The city has blamed the water problem on dirt and mud build up in a water tank that was flushed, the newspaper reported.”

Despite the water bottle donations, the town’s residents are not happy. “We didn’t get a warning” one resident said, “We didn’t get a warning that this was going to happen.”

The Laredo office of the Texas Commission on Environmental is investigating the reports of black water and a water department employee said residents should boil water before using it.

While the people of this Texas town have real signs that they should be worried about their water, your water doesn’t have to be completely black to be unsafe. As we know, the people of Flint (and many other towns) have been dealing with a serious health crisis as unsafe levels of lead were found in the drinking water. This was exceptionally scary because heavy metals like lead, and contaminants like E. coli or Giardia do not change the look or taste of your water. That means that you can’t tell if your water is contaminated by taste or look alone.

So how can we be sure that our water is safe?

“This is  reminder to all of us,”  says Fresh Water Systems Water Quality Specialist Geoff Dethloff, “that even if we have a municipal water source, we are not immune to having contaminants in our water.” Dethloff goes onto explain that while black water is not a common problem, we should be aware of what could potentially be contaminating out water. Fresh Water Systems offers a number of water quality tests that you can do quickly and easily. There are at-home test kits and lab send-in test kits depending on what you prefer.

“If you are concerned about bacteria or particulate matter,” says Dethloff, “you should look into getting a UV system [for the bacteria], and a filter [for the dirt.” Fresh Water Systems offers the Viqua IHS UV system, which filters our sediment and also disinfects your water.

If you have any questions, please call us at (866) 986-8895. One of our certified water quality specialists will be happy to assist you.

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Unsafe Lead Levels Not Limited To Flint, According To The NY Times

Unsafe Lead Levels Not Limited To Flint, According To The NY Times

According to an article written today in the New York Times, lead contamination is not only in Flint, Michigan and we all have reason to be concerned. In recent years, unsafe levels of lead have been found in:

  1. Sebring, OH (2016)
  2. Washington, DC (2001)
  3. Durham and Greenville, NC (2006)
  4. Columbia, SC (2005)
  5. Jackson, MS (2015)

While “Federal officials and many scientists agree that most of the nation’s 53,000 community water systems provide safe drinking water…such episodes are unsettling reminders of what experts say are holes in the safety net of rules and procedures intended to keep water not just lead-free, but free of all poisons.” So what can we do about it?

Fresh Water Systems offers a number of solutions to lead detection and decontamination. You can also read another one of our blog posts about lead contamination to help figure out if you have lead in your water.

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Water Disinfection: UV Or Chlorine? Which Is Better?

Water Disinfection: UV Or Chlorine? Which Is Better?

Because you can’t see, smell or taste harmful microbes in your water, it is important to properly disinfect your water supply. So which is better? UV light or chlorine?

Both constant chlorination and UV disinfection are recognized by authorities like the EPA and Health Canada as effective means of disinfection. UV adoption, though, is on the rise because it is effective against a broader range of microorganisms, including protozoa, like Cryptosporidium and Giardia. It is also a chemical-free, environmentally-friendly solution.

While Chlorine has been used since the early 1900s, UV disinfection (in more primitive terms) has been used for centuries. Once it was discovered that UV wavelengths had germicidal characteristics, that technology was harnessed and turned into the UV water disinfection that we have today.

Ultraviolet light is a sophisticated disinfection solution, but it doesn’t require an overly technical explanation. Light of a specific wavelength is passed through the water, inactivating any pathogens that are present. Because they are inactivated, microbes can no longer multiply, which means they can’t cause infection.

For the best results and minimal maintenance, UV systems do require some pre-treatment. At the least, this includes a sediment filter, which is often included with the newer, high quality systems. But for the most part, UV systems require less maintenance than a chlorinator, so you won’t be making countless nuisance service calls that take you away from the business of selling. However, depending on the quality of the water, the quartz sleeve will require periodic cleaning.
This can often be coincided with the annual lamp change. With a managed service schedule, it’s possible to balance service satisfaction and customer loyalty.

For more information on Fresh Water Systems’ UV products, and for an informative video on UV disinfection, click here.

 

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Boil-Water Advisory Issued – What Do You Do?

Boil-Water Advisory Issued – What Do You Do?

Aqua New Jersey recently issued a boil advisory for the town of Phillipsburg, New Jersey. Aqua New Jersey’s website tells us that an equipment malfunction with an ultraviolet treatment system led to incomplete disinfection for some water distributed to properties.

So what exactly is a boil advisory? When a boil advisory is issued, it means that all water used for ingestion, including water used for washing fruits and vegetables must be boiled. Government agencies even warn that after hand washing, antiseptic washes should be used to keep bacteria from being accidentally ingested.

The advisory tells residents to “bring the water to a full rolling boil for 1 minute before using for cooking or drinking.”

But there are easier and more sustainable alternatives to filter your water in the case of a contamination.

The AquaCera countertop filtration system offers a simple and easy-to-use alternative to boiling your water. It filters out 99.9% of pathogenic organisms like E. Coli and Giardia, and it has a convenient flow rate of one half-gallon per minute. If you want to filter the water throughout your home, the AquaCera Gravity Water Filter System offers an excellent and safe option, providing your home with safe water, and removing the same bacteria that a boil alert warns you against.

If you are concerned about the safety of your water, you can call our water experts at 1-877-335-3339.

 

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Can Ice Be Contaminated with E.Coli?

Can Ice Be Contaminated with E.Coli?

Packaged ice can become contaminated with heterotrophs, coliforms, and E.Coli a recent study by the University of Georgia shows. Solution for commercial ice machines is the Ice Wand ice water filter.

Have you ever thought that bagged ice you buy at a convince store could be contaminated with heterotrophs, coliforms, and E.Coli? Most of us believe the freezing temperatures would prevent any bacteria and or sanitation issues from find its way into ice cubes. In a recent study by the University of Georgia found stores, fast food restaurants, gas stations, and self-serve vending machines. If you make and bag your own ice or if you own ice vending machines, your customers are at an increased risk of being exposed to contaminated or tainted ice and you may be liable for damages and/or recall expense.

 

Following a regular commercial ice machine cleaning schedule will prevent the build-up of bacterial and bio-film that causes ice to become contaminated but it can be very costly. A solution to keeping your ice machine clean, preventing ice from becoming contaminated, and reducing your yearly ice product cost is the Ice Wand. The Ice wand is a commercial ice machine water filter that can reduce, or even eliminate, machine cleanings reduce your operating cost all the while protecting the quality of ice being produced.

Ice Wand Ice Machine Water Filter Features

  • Dramatically reduced cleaning and maintenance requirements and costs
  • Improved overall beverage and ice quality
  • Reduces taste and odor concerns
  • Extends life of commercial ice cube machine
  • Compatible with almost all commercial ice cube machines including
  • Long shelf life
  • No chlorine additives, carcinogenic chemicals, or toxic by-products
  • Safe to handle; easy installation after a thorough cleaning
  • Oxidation resistant – safe for ice machine parts
  • Made in the USA

Ice Contamination Infographic

How an Ice Machine Water Filter can Prevent Packaged Ice Contamination

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Dorm Essentials: Will your college student’s water be safe?

Dorm Essentials: Will your college student’s water be safe?

Back-to-school-water specials

Fireworks, picnics, and baseball games–July 4th has come and gone, and summer is almost over. Kids will be going back to school soon, and college freshmen will soon be traveling to their chosen campus. They will meet their new roommates, decide on which classes to take, and learn how to navigate a new town or city.

The shopping list for your student’s new apartment or dorm room probably includes new linens, notebooks, and maybe even a laptop. But, have you thought about whether or not your student will have access to good, clean water?

Colleges and universities usually have two options for student housing: residence halls that are owned and maintained by the university or private apartments selected by the student. Depending on the age of the apartment building or dormitory hall and the source of the tap water, your student may be at risk for exposure to lead, chlorine, bacteria and other contaminants that could be damaging to his or her health. How can you avoid these contaminants and make sure that your newly-minted high school graduate will be safe? Here are a few steps you can take to provide your college student with the best and safest water possible:

Step 1: Find out more about the tap water

The first step to protecting your college student is finding out more about the source of water. For example, if your student is going to college in Los Angeles, CA, he or she might be exposed to high levels of cancer-causing “THMs” and even Arsenic.

  • Contact the college or university and ask them for information. A small amount of colleges and universities have begun to realize the need for filtered water and may already provide it in cafeterias or student lounges.
  • Read the most recent customer confidence reports for the municipality where your college student’s future alma mater is located. This research will provide you with the
    information needed to decide the best water filtration system.

Step 2: Give your college student an easy to use product that will provide great tasting, filtered water.

1. If your student’s new home has water that tastes and smells like chlorine, OmniFilterbut has few other contaminants, the easiest solution is to give him or her an OmniFilter PF500 Water Filter Pitcher. For just $30.98 (not including shipping), this pitcher and  water filter 3 pack will provide the college student with an easy to use solution for filtered water. This product even includes an electronic change indicator, that reminds the user when it is time to change the carbon filter.

For tap water that contains more hard to remove contaminants like pesticides, bacteria, or lead, a different water filtration system is needed. Here are three options that will work nicely in a dormroom or apartment:

2. Culligan FM-15A Faucet Filter    Culligan FM15A

  •  Reduces lead, cysts, and other contaminants.
  •  Easy to install, only $19.99  (before shipping).
  • Filter must be changed every 2-3 months.

3. AquaCera HCP Countertop Ceramic Drinking Water Filter SystemHCP-AquaCera

  • Reduces 99.99% of pathogenic organisms (including E. Coli, etc.).
  • Reduces chlorine, lead, arsenic, and other contaminants.
  • Easy installation that requires no under the sink plumbing.
  • Costs $99.99 (not including shipping).
  • Ceramic filter candle will only need replacing after 6 months to a 1 year.

4. Nimbus Water Maker Mini RO System Watermakermini

  • Reduces 96% of Total Dissolved Solids (includes nitrates and other chemicals).
  • Fits simply and easily over the faucet.
  • Costs $98.99 (not including shipping).
  • Interior membrane filter cartridge lasts for about 1 year.

NeoVas water bottle

Don’t forget to get a reusable, stainless-steel water bottle with a Neo-Tote that will let your college student carry along this great tasting, filtered water!

 


 

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