Organization Hacks You Will Actually Use

Organization Hacks You Will Actually Use

I don’t know about you, but the storage in the cabinet under my kitchen sink is the most dysfunctional and frustrating space in my house for me to organize. The under-sink cabinet is a pretty large area and has the potential to store a lot of my kitchen supplies, but I always had trouble fitting my filter in with the rest of the supplies that that I wanted to store.

To further add to the issue, most plumbing pipes don’t nicely tuck away in the back. Instead the elbow joints and different pipes jut out and make the space awkward and uneven. I live in an area that uses the city’s water source (and I am not fond of all of the chlorine and bacteria is the water), so it is important for me to keep my water filtration system and tank installed under my sink so that I can use filtered water for cooking and drinking. I can’t move or get rid of the filtration system, so I finally decided to make organizing my cabinet under the sink a priority.

Use Tension Rods To Hang Spray Bottles

I set up a tension rod along my under-sink cabinet so that I could hang my spray bottles, and any other cleaning supplies that could fit. This way, I can just grab them and go and they are not just cluttered together in a corner.

Use Containers To Hold Sponges

I put all of the sponges and other cleaning supplies that I had in stackable containers. I like this because when I am ready for a new sponge, I can just throw out the old one and grab a new one.

Use a Paper Organizer To Hold Foils And Wraps

I mounted a paper holder to the door of my under-sink cabinet and put all of my foils, plastic wraps, and wax paper containers in it. This way, I can just open the cabinet and grab what I need.

As for a water filter, I use Fresh Water System’s Watts Premier RO Water Filtration System. I use this filter because it doesn’t take up as much space as some other under-sink filters do. The filter itself lines up again the wall of my cabinet and the size of the tank (to store a few gallons of water so that it doesn’t just trickle out at the faucet when I turn it on) is manageable. I bought this filter also because it filters out a lot of the contaminates that are in my water supply like pesticides, herbicides, and lead.

Our water used to have a funny taste to it too, but the system filters out any bad taste or smell. There is also a 3-gallon filter that gets installed with the system. This is basically because the process of properly filtering the water takes a long time, so the storage system lets us just turn on the faucet and pour a glass of water, rather than having to wait a 10 or 20 minutes for a cup.

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Dorm Essentials: Will your college student’s water be safe?

Dorm Essentials: Will your college student’s water be safe?

Back-to-school-water specials

Fireworks, picnics, and baseball games–July 4th has come and gone, and summer is almost over. Kids will be going back to school soon, and college freshmen will soon be traveling to their chosen campus. They will meet their new roommates, decide on which classes to take, and learn how to navigate a new town or city.

The shopping list for your student’s new apartment or dorm room probably includes new linens, notebooks, and maybe even a laptop. But, have you thought about whether or not your student will have access to good, clean water?

Colleges and universities usually have two options for student housing: residence halls that are owned and maintained by the university or private apartments selected by the student. Depending on the age of the apartment building or dormitory hall and the source of the tap water, your student may be at risk for exposure to lead, chlorine, bacteria and other contaminants that could be damaging to his or her health. How can you avoid these contaminants and make sure that your newly-minted high school graduate will be safe? Here are a few steps you can take to provide your college student with the best and safest water possible:

Step 1: Find out more about the tap water

The first step to protecting your college student is finding out more about the source of water. For example, if your student is going to college in Los Angeles, CA, he or she might be exposed to high levels of cancer-causing “THMs” and even Arsenic.

  • Contact the college or university and ask them for information. A small amount of colleges and universities have begun to realize the need for filtered water and may already provide it in cafeterias or student lounges.
  • Read the most recent customer confidence reports for the municipality where your college student’s future alma mater is located. This research will provide you with the
    information needed to decide the best water filtration system.

Step 2: Give your college student an easy to use product that will provide great tasting, filtered water.

1. If your student’s new home has water that tastes and smells like chlorine, OmniFilterbut has few other contaminants, the easiest solution is to give him or her an OmniFilter PF500 Water Filter Pitcher. For just $30.98 (not including shipping), this pitcher and  water filter 3 pack will provide the college student with an easy to use solution for filtered water. This product even includes an electronic change indicator, that reminds the user when it is time to change the carbon filter.

For tap water that contains more hard to remove contaminants like pesticides, bacteria, or lead, a different water filtration system is needed. Here are three options that will work nicely in a dormroom or apartment:

2. Culligan FM-15A Faucet Filter    Culligan FM15A

  •  Reduces lead, cysts, and other contaminants.
  •  Easy to install, only $19.99  (before shipping).
  • Filter must be changed every 2-3 months.

3. AquaCera HCP Countertop Ceramic Drinking Water Filter SystemHCP-AquaCera

  • Reduces 99.99% of pathogenic organisms (including E. Coli, etc.).
  • Reduces chlorine, lead, arsenic, and other contaminants.
  • Easy installation that requires no under the sink plumbing.
  • Costs $99.99 (not including shipping).
  • Ceramic filter candle will only need replacing after 6 months to a 1 year.

4. Nimbus Water Maker Mini RO System Watermakermini

  • Reduces 96% of Total Dissolved Solids (includes nitrates and other chemicals).
  • Fits simply and easily over the faucet.
  • Costs $98.99 (not including shipping).
  • Interior membrane filter cartridge lasts for about 1 year.

NeoVas water bottle

Don’t forget to get a reusable, stainless-steel water bottle with a Neo-Tote that will let your college student carry along this great tasting, filtered water!

 


 

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Home Water Filters Provide Best Protection for Drinking Water

Home Water Filters Provide Best Protection for Drinking Water

Goldseal As news reports about pharmaceuticals in water circulate, here are several facts for consumers to consider:

  • Filtering systems in the home provide the highest technology available for treatment of drinking water. Less than two percent of all water consumed is ingested by humans, making these “point-of-use” systems the most cost-effective and environmentally friendly.
  • While utilities are required to meet safety standards set by the U.S. EPA, home filtering systems
    act as a final contaminant barrier and can further purify water for drinking.
  • While specific product performance standards have not yet been developed for pharmaceuticals,
    many point-of-use technologies have proven effective for some of these emerging contaminants. Nano-filtration and reverse osmosis systems removed drugs tested by the Colorado School of Mines at full-scale facilities in Arizona and California. Activated carbon, distillation, ozonation, and advanced oxidization have likewise shown promise in removing many of these contaminants. Individual manufacturers can also test products for specific pharmaceuticals if they choose.
  • According to Utah State University Extension, up to 90 percent of oral drugs can pass through humans unchanged. These often then move through wastewater into streams and groundwater. It is generally cost prohibitive for utilities to use systems such as nano-filtration, long contact activated carbon, and reverse osmosis. However, these technologies have proven successful at removing many contaminants in home water treatment systems.
  • In addition to pharmaceuticals, water quality experts are examining other emerging contaminants, such as those found in personal care products and pesticides. These are often referred to as endocrine disrupting chemicals. Home filtering systems have also been proven to treat threats such as lead and mercury.
  • WQA provides Gold Seal certification for products that remove a variety of contaminants.
  • Consumers can learn about different treatment systems and find locally certified dealers by visiting the WQA Web site’s Gold Seal and Find A Professional features.
  • More information is available at WQA’s Water Information Library online, which includes a search feature.

WQA is a non-profit association that provides public information about water treatment issues and also trains and certifies professionals to better serve consumers. WQA has more than 2,500 members nationwide.

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