Is your commercial ice machine producing low quality ice that is cloudy and discolored? Learn what factors affect smell and color of ice cubes along with how to use a water filtration system to improve it.

Prevent-bad-smell-and-cloudy-ice-cubes

Some people believe that when they get an ice machine all they have to do is plug it into the water line and let it go.  Some ice makers are designed to be plug-and-play like that, but is setting up an ice maker directly off of the municipal tap water lines the best idea? Will you get the clearest and best quality ice from that ice machine? The answer is no.

Truth is, while each municipality has measures in place to filter out the contaminants that you find in tap water, water can pick up additional contaminants, chemicals, and even bacteria as it travels through the pipes to get to your location. Some of these contaminants include minerals from pipes. Of course it’s not bad for you, since it is safe tap water, but there’s a really good chance that it needs to be filtered again before it gets made into ice.

Without a filtration device on your lines, the water that goes into your ice machine is going to be the same water that leaves your tap, filled with minerals from the travel and chemicals from the treatment plant.

Doesn’t the ice making process get rid of chemicals and minerals?

Yes, the process of making ice does get rid of some particulates that are in tap water. As ice freezes, some of the heavier particles fall out of the ice. A good quality ice machine will have a way to remove these so scale doesn’t build up.

However, there are other contaminants that stick around. These can give your ice a foul taste and an off-color. Furthermore, unfiltered water accelerates the development of scale and buildup in the lines outside of the machine, reducing the efficiency of the ice machine.

An Analogy

Think about the contaminants in the unfiltered tap water like debris in a hallway.  This debris is large enough to slow you down, but not large enough to completely stop the works.  By removing the debris from the hallway, you’re able to walk down it unencumbered.  The same process works for a commercial ice machine: with fewer particles to get in the lines, the more productive and efficient the machine becomes.

While there is some natural filtration with the condensing and evaporating process, filtering water is not the machine’s purpose.  It does not specifically focus on the elimination of contaminants like an ice filter will.  This means that the chlorine and other off-flavors have the potential of making it through to your ice.

The filtration of water before it enters the ice machine significantly increases the production of the ice machine, along with both the freshness and clarity of the cubes which are produced.  You should install a water filter on your lines to ensure you can get the best ice you can. Clear, tasty ice means a positive customer service experience, as well as less wear and tear on your ice machine.

 

Article provided by IceMachinesPlus.com

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